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Artist’s Way: My excuses and guilt trips


I have several paintings that call out to me from time to time. I manage to pass them by.

My excuses:

  1. but the house is messy
  2. the taxes aren’t done
  3. you need income – you can’t afford to spend your time or money on this.

4. It’s just a hobby. Don’t deserve time on a hobby with all these other things undone.

5. I’m not a very good artist.  No one will want to ever buy these. Or even worse, I don’t really want to sell them.

These guilt trips also go for writing as well: other tasks should be more important, not a very good writer, can’t sell anything and so on. Add to the above the confusion as to what to work on first. Finish the novel (s) put short stories together, compile that poetry chapbook? Which one would make the most money (Will any of them make any money?)

There it is – money again. Worries about the publishing business, E-books, Kindle, etc. Lots of ‘what’s the use, I won’t be able to make any money anyway.’ Even if I finish something, how to I get enough people to buy it to make ends even wave at each other, much less meet? If you can’t make money, is it less worthwhile?  Money, money …

Probably not, but if you need money and don’t have enough to live, don’t you need to concentrate on that first? Again probably, yes. (No probably about it!)  But should you throw away all your minutes just because you can’t find a job/income?

Julia claims that when you clear your channels, what you are supposed to do (or be) will present itself. Or you will be able to see what was perhaps there all along. I hope the ‘what’ includes at least a little money.

Money 😦

Artist’s Way – Thoughts about the creative recovery process


.Thoughts about the creative recovery process  My comments in [  ]

Artist’s Way

The purpose of art is life – intensified, brilliant. When your life feels flat, you need to take step to get on the path to better creativity. That path is not straight, but more like a spiral. You will go by the same are many times if you are progressing, but on a higher level each time. [Interesting concept. I always think of a path as being, if not straight, at least flat. This is a new way of thinking about paths.]

Julia advises us to pick a combination of tasks that appeal the most to you and also ones that you strongly resist, because we often resist what we need the most. [I can attest to the truth of this. It’s true in about every aspect of life, isn’t it?]

To give us an idea of what to expect, she outlines the typical phases in creative recovery:

1.  Entry level.  Defiance and giddiness  [I know a lot about the first one, unfortunately.]

2. Explosive anger   [me – ditto. Angry about not being able to do things or even regret about what has been lost]

3. Grief – alternating waves of resistance and hope. Peaks and valleys. a ‘birthing’ process of elation and defensive skepticism.  [Again, I can relate to the resistance. I have plenty of that, It is the hope part that is lacking. I hope I fan the flame of hope enough to get through.]

4. Urge to abandon the process and return to earlier life. Temptation to abandon the course.  A creative U-turn.  [I’ve abandoned this course before, so I know all about this one. I am hoping that blogging this journey will help keep me on track.]

5. Recommitment to the process triggers the ‘free-fall’ of major ego surrender. [Difficult concept to imagine. Much less put into practice.]

6. A new sense of self. Increased autonomy. Resilience and the ability to make and execute concrete creative plans. [Sounds wonderful. I am looking forward to getting to this stage.]

STOP:

1. – saying “It’s too late.”  [I’m guilty of this]

2. – waiting until you make enough money …  [also guilty]

3. – telling yourself that it’s just your ego whenever you crave a more creative live

4. – telling yourself that dreams don’t matter or that you should be more sensible [also guilty]

5. – fearing your family and friends will think you are crazy [or irresponsible…]

6. – thinking that creativity is a luxury or you should [just] be grateful for what you have

The Artist’s Way Thoughts about the creative recovery process


Thoughts about the creative recovery process.  My comments in [  ]

The purpose of art is life – intensified, brilliant. When your life feels flat, you need to take step to get on the path to better creativity. That path is not straight, but more like a spiral. You will go by the same are many times if you are progressing, but on a higher level each time. [Interesting concept. I always think of a path as being, if not straight, at least flat. This is a new way of thinking about paths.]

Julia advises us to pick a combination of tasks that appeal the most to you and also ones that you strongly resist, because we often resist what we need the most. [I can attest to the truth of this. It’s true in about every aspect of life, isn’t it?]

To give us an idea of what to expect, she outlines the typical phases in creative recovery:

1.  Entry level.  Defiance and giddiness  [I know a lot about the first one, unfortunately.]

2. Explosive anger   [me – ditto. Angry about not being able to do things or even regret about what has been lost]

3. Grief – alternating waves of resistance and hope. Peaks and valleys. a ‘birthing’ process of elation and defensive skepticism.  [Again, I can relate to the resistance. I have plenty of that, It is the hope part that is lacking. I hope I fan the flame of hope enough to get through.]

4. Urge to abandon the process and return to earlier life. Temptation to abandon the course.  A creative U-turn.  [I’ve abandoned this course before, so I know all about this one. I am hoping that blogging this journey will help keep me on track.]

5. Recommitment to the process triggers the ‘free-fall’ of major ego surrender. [Difficult concept to imagine. Much less put into practice.]

6. A new sense of self. Increased autonomy. Resilience and the ability to make and execute concrete creative plans. [Sounds wonderful. I am looking forward to getting to this stage.]

STOP:

1. – saying “It’s too late.”  [I’m guilty of this]

2. – waiting until you make enough money …  [also guilty]

3. – telling yourself that it’s just your ego whenever you crave a more creative live

4. – telling yourself that dreams don’t matter or that you should be more sensible [also guilty]

5. – fearing your family and friends will think you are crazy [or irresponsible…]

6. – thinking that creativity is a luxury or you should [just] be grateful for what you have