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Ladies can be Astronauts too.


The Mercury 13

From left: Gene Nora Jessen, Wally Funk, Jerrie Cobb, Jerri Truhill, Sarah Rutley, Myrtle Cagle and Bernice SteadmanMembers of the First Lady Astronaut Trainees (FLATs, also known as the “Mercury 13”), these seven women who once aspired to fly into space stand outside Launch Pad 39B near the Space Shuttle Discovery in this photograph from 1995. The so-called Mercury 13 was a group of women who trained to become astronauts for America’s first human spaceflight program in the early 1960s. Although FLATs was never an official NASA program, the commitment of these women paved the way for others who followed. Visiting the space center as invited guests of STS-63 Pilot Eileen Collins, the first female shuttle pilot and later the first female shuttle commander, are (from left): Gene Nora Jessen, Wally Funk, Jerrie Cobb, Jerri Truhill, Sarah Rutley, Myrtle Cagle and Bernice Steadman.

Image credit: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_691.html

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Through the Looking Glass to Outer Space.


Into the Looking Glass

From http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/iotd.html

Recently, technicians at NASA’s Marshall Space Flight Center in Huntsville, Ala., completed a series of cryogenic tests on six James Webb Space Telescope beryllium mirror segments at the center’s X-ray & Cryogenic Facility. During testing, the mirrors were subjected to extreme temperatures dipping to -415 degrees Fahrenheit, permitting engineers to measure in extreme detail how the shape of the mirror changes as it cools.

The Webb telescope has 18 mirrors, each of which will be tested twice in the Center’s X-ray & Cryogenic Facility to ensure that the mirror will maintain its shape in a space environment — once with bare polished beryllium and then again after a thin coating of gold is applied.

The cryogenic test gauges how each mirror changes temperature and

shape over a range of operational temperatures in space. This helps predict how well the telescope will image infrared sources.

The mirrors are designed to stay cold to allow scientists to observe the infrared light they reflect using a telescope and instruments optimized to detect this light. Warm objects give off infrared light, or heat. If the Webb telescope mirror is too warm, the faint infrared light from distant galaxies may be lost in the infrared glow of the mirror itself. Thus, the Webb telescope’s mirrors need to operate in a deep cold or cryogenic state, at around -379 degree Fahrenheit.

Image Credit: NASA

Composer born July 24. Ernest Bloch (Yes I know, I’m late. )


Ernest Bloch (July 24, 1880 – July 15, 1959) was a Swiss-born American composer.

He wrote some hauntingly beautiful pieces for the viola.

Back in a past life when I was halfway a decent violist,  I played a couple of them.  The piece featured here more Hebraic and less almost avant-garde than the Suite, but both just reach in and grab the longing and yearning in my hear

From Wikipedia ….

Bloch was born in Geneva and began playing the violin at age 9. He began composing soon afterwards. He studied music at the conservatory in Brussels, where his teachers included the celebrated Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. He then travelled around Europe, moving to Germany (where he studied composition from 1900-1901 with Iwan Knorr at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt), on to Paris in 1903 and back to Geneva before settling in the United States in 1916, taking American citizenship in 1924. He held several teaching appointments in the U.S., with George Antheil, Frederick Jacobi, Bernard Rogers, and Roger Sessions among his pupils. In December 1920 he was appointed the first Musical Director of the newly formed Cleveland Institute of Music, a post he held until 1925. Following this he was director of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music until 930.

In 1941 Bloch moved to the small coastal community of Agate Beach, Oregon and lived there the rest of his life. He died in 1959 in Portland, Oregon, of cancer at the age of 78. The Bloch Memorial has been moved from near his house in Agate Beach to a more prominent location at the Newport Performing Arts Center in Newport, Oregon[2].

Ways to Use Social Networking to Land Your Next Job


Ways to Use Social Networking to Land Your Next Job.

From AARP via the Washington Post.

What is Theme in Literature? (via Global Mysteries)


Always some good writing tips on this blog. Thaks Nancy.

What is Theme in Literature? Defining theme in fiction can be difficult. Sometimes it helps to define what it is not. It is not the plot (what characters do). It is not the story subject (the topic the author writes about). It is not usually stated directly. Now that we know what theme is not, let’s examine what it is. The theme of a book is an idea about life or human nature or elements of society that the author shares with her readers. Often it is the lesson or moral unde … Read More

via Global Mysteries

Unemployment and Fear. An article at Tikkun Daily by Lita Kurth.


Timely article on unemployment and its emotional ramifications.

Unemployment, Fear, and What We Can Do

by: Lita Kurth on July 20th, 2010

Photo at http://www.tikkun.org/tikkundaily/wp-content/uploads/Workers_unemployed_by_the_freeze_in_California.jpg

Composer born July 27. Enrique Granados y Campiña


Enrique Granados y Campiña (Lleida, 27 July 1867 – English Channel, 24 March 1916) was a Spanish Catalan pianist and composer of classical music. His music is in a uniquely Spanish style and, as such, representative of musical nationalism. Enrique Granados was also a talented painter in the style of Francisco Goya.

See full article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Granados

or – if you prefer guitar.