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This Is Your Brain on Bach | Vanderbilt Magazine | Vanderbilt University


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via This Is Your Brain on Bach

From  Vanderbilt Magazine | Vanderbilt University.

Composer born July 24. Ernest Bloch (Yes I know, I’m late. )


Ernest Bloch (July 24, 1880 – July 15, 1959) was a Swiss-born American composer.

He wrote some hauntingly beautiful pieces for the viola.

Back in a past life when I was halfway a decent violist,  I played a couple of them.  The piece featured here more Hebraic and less almost avant-garde than the Suite, but both just reach in and grab the longing and yearning in my hear

From Wikipedia ….

Bloch was born in Geneva and began playing the violin at age 9. He began composing soon afterwards. He studied music at the conservatory in Brussels, where his teachers included the celebrated Belgian violinist Eugène Ysaÿe. He then travelled around Europe, moving to Germany (where he studied composition from 1900-1901 with Iwan Knorr at the Hoch Conservatory in Frankfurt), on to Paris in 1903 and back to Geneva before settling in the United States in 1916, taking American citizenship in 1924. He held several teaching appointments in the U.S., with George Antheil, Frederick Jacobi, Bernard Rogers, and Roger Sessions among his pupils. In December 1920 he was appointed the first Musical Director of the newly formed Cleveland Institute of Music, a post he held until 1925. Following this he was director of the San Francisco Conservatory of Music until 930.

In 1941 Bloch moved to the small coastal community of Agate Beach, Oregon and lived there the rest of his life. He died in 1959 in Portland, Oregon, of cancer at the age of 78. The Bloch Memorial has been moved from near his house in Agate Beach to a more prominent location at the Newport Performing Arts Center in Newport, Oregon[2].

Composer born July 27. Enrique Granados y Campiña


Enrique Granados y Campiña (Lleida, 27 July 1867 – English Channel, 24 March 1916) was a Spanish Catalan pianist and composer of classical music. His music is in a uniquely Spanish style and, as such, representative of musical nationalism. Enrique Granados was also a talented painter in the style of Francisco Goya.

See full article at http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Enrique_Granados

or – if you prefer guitar.

Composer born July 27 – Ernö von Dohnányi


Ernö von Dohnányi

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ern%C5%91_Dohn%C3%A1nyi#References

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I. hadn’t heard this piece before. I like it.

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Composer born today -July 12. George Butterworth


I was listening to KDFC on the way home from playing Oklahoma! and heard something I thought was Vaughan Williams. I was wrong. The composer turned out to be George Butterworth. But he and Vaughan Williams were close friends. Aha! I was close.

George Sainton Kaye Butterworth, (12 July 1885 – 5 August 1916) was an English composer best known for his tone poem The Banks of Green Willow and his settings of A. E. Housman’s poems.

Vaughan Williams and Butterworth became close friends. It was Butterworth who suggested to Vaughan Williams that he turn a symphonic poem he was working on into his London Symphony. When the manuscript for that piece was lost (having been sent to Fritz Busch in Germany just before the outbreak of war), Butterworth, together with Geoffrey Toye and the critic Edward J. Dent, helped Vaughan Williams reconstruct the work.[1] Vaughan Williams dedicated the piece to Butterworth’s memory after his death. Upon leaving Oxford, Butterworth began a career in music, writing criticism for The Times, composing, and teaching at Radley College, Oxfordshire. He also briefly studied at the Royal College of Music where he worked with Hubert Parry among others.

http://www.rubecula.com/Butterworth/Butterworth.html

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THe Banks of Green Willow. Kind of soft and pastoral at least at the beginning.

Composer born on the 4th of July. Stephen Collins Foster. The Father of American Music.


What could be more appropriate on the 4th than the “Father of American Music?” Talk about born on the 4th of July.

From Wikipedia:

Stephen Collins Foster (July 4, 1826 – January 13, 1864), known as the “father of American music”, was the pre-eminent songwriter in the United States of the 19th century. His songs – such as “Oh! Susanna”, “Camptown Races”, “Old Folks at Home” (“Swanee River”), “Hard Times Come Again No More”, “My Old Kentucky Home”, “Old Black Joe”, and “Beautiful Dreamer” – remain popular over 150 years after their composition.

Although many of his songs had Southern themes, Foster never lived in the South and visited it only once, by river-boat voyage (on his brother Dunning’s steam boat, the James Millinger) down the Mississippi to New Orleans, during his honeymoon in 1852.

He had become impoverished while living at the North American Hotel at 30 Bowery on the Lower East Side of Manhattan, New York. His brother Henry described the accident that led to his death: Confined to bed for days by a persistent fever, Foster tried to call a chambermaid, but collapsed, falling against the washbasin next to his bed and shattering it, which gouged his head. It took three hours to get him to Bellevue Hospital, and in an era before transfusions and antibiotics, he succumbed three days after his admittance at the age of thirty-seven.

In his worn leather wallet, there was found a scrap of paper that simply said “Dear friends and gentle hearts” along with 35 cents in Civil War scrip and three pennies.

Foster was buried in the Allegheny Cemetery in Pittsburgh. One of his best loved works, “Beautiful Dreamer”, was published shortly after his death.

Composer born on July 2. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . Christoph Willibald Ritter von Gluck


Gluck, detail of a portrait by Joseph Duplessis, dated 1775 (Kunsthistorisches Museum, Vienna)

Christoph Willibald Ritter von Gluck (2 July 1714  – 15 November 1787) was an opera composer of the early classical period. After many years at the Habsburg court at Vienna, Gluck brought about the practical reform of opera’s dramaturgical practices that many intellectuals had been campaigning for over the years. With a series of radical new works in the 1760s, among them Orfeo ed Euridice and Alceste, he broke the stranglehold that Metastasian opera seria had enjoyed for much of the century.

Listen to  Orfeo ed Euridice – Dance of the Blessed Spirits