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How do you go to the bathroom in space?


Several people have asked this question, so here is some information. There’s even a book. How Do You Go To The Bathroom In Space? [Paperback] William R. Pogue (Author) at Amazon.com


Toilet Use: http://space.about.com/cs/spaceshuttles/a/bathroominspace.htm

Since there is no gravity to either hold a toilet bowl full of water in place or pull human wastes down, designing a toilet for zero-gravity was not an easy task. NASA had to develop a way to use air flow to make the urine or feces go where they wanted.

There is a toilet on each space shuttle which can be used by men or women. Although it is designed to be as much as possible like those on Earth, there are a number of changes. Straps are in place to hold feet against the floor. Pivoting bars swing across the thighs, ensuring the user remains seated. Since the system operates on a vacuum, a tight seal is essential.

Besides the main toilet bowl, there is a hose, which is utilized as a urinal by men and women. It can be used in a standing position or can be attached to the commode by a pivoting mounting bracket for use in a sitting position. A separate receptacle allows for disposal of wipes. All three units use flowing air instead of water to move waste through the system.

The human waste is separated and solid wastes are compressed and stored on-board, and then removed after landing. Waste water is vented to space, although future systems may recycle it. The air is filtered to remove odor and bacteria and then returned to the cabin.

Hopefully, there is sufficient reading material aboard for the task.

The Orbital Workshop waste management compartment

NASA Marshall Space Flight Center (NASA-MSFC) A wide-angle view of the Orbital Workshop waste management compartment. The actual toilet's down the hall, to your right.

Other links:

http://imagine.gsfc.nasa.gov/docs/ask_astro/answers/970411a.html

http://quest.arc.nasa.gov/people/journals/space/keith/05-25-98.html

Ladies can be Astronauts too.


The Mercury 13

From left: Gene Nora Jessen, Wally Funk, Jerrie Cobb, Jerri Truhill, Sarah Rutley, Myrtle Cagle and Bernice SteadmanMembers of the First Lady Astronaut Trainees (FLATs, also known as the “Mercury 13”), these seven women who once aspired to fly into space stand outside Launch Pad 39B near the Space Shuttle Discovery in this photograph from 1995. The so-called Mercury 13 was a group of women who trained to become astronauts for America’s first human spaceflight program in the early 1960s. Although FLATs was never an official NASA program, the commitment of these women paved the way for others who followed. Visiting the space center as invited guests of STS-63 Pilot Eileen Collins, the first female shuttle pilot and later the first female shuttle commander, are (from left): Gene Nora Jessen, Wally Funk, Jerrie Cobb, Jerri Truhill, Sarah Rutley, Myrtle Cagle and Bernice Steadman.

Image credit: NASA

http://www.nasa.gov/multimedia/imagegallery/image_feature_691.html

Happy 4th of July from NASA Astronaut Douglas Wheeler


Astronaut Sends Fourth of July Message From Space
By Tariq Malik
SPACE.com Managing Editor
posted: 04 July 2010
02:02 pm ET

An American astronaut spending the Fourth of July in space wished the United States a happy Independence Day from orbit on Sunday.

NASA astronaut Douglas Wheelock posted his July 4th messages and photos on Twitter, where he writes as Astro_Wheels, to mark the U.S. holiday on the International Space Station (ISS).

“Happy 4th of July!” wrote Wheelock, who is a colonel in the U.S. Army. “Celebrating Independence Day morning in the Russian ‘Service Module’, the ISS Command Post.” [Wheelock’s Fourth of July space photo.]

Space photo – July 2. Apollo 16 mission to the moon


Talk about “Fly me to the moon.” Or should I say – flew me to the moon.

 All-American Salute

All-American Salute

Astronaut John W. Young, commander of the Apollo 16 lunar landing mission, leaps from the lunar surface as he salutes the United States flag at the Descartes landing site during the first Apollo 16 extravehicular activity. Astronaut Charles M. Duke Jr., lunar module pilot, took this picture. The Lunar Module “Orion” is on the left. The Lunar Roving Vehicle is parked beside Orion and the object behind Young (in the shadow of the Lunar Module) is the Far Ultraviolet Camera/Spectrograph. Stone Mountain dominates the background of this lunar scene.

Image Credit: NASA

Space photo of the day. July 1 Interactive media -space suits from NASA


The NASA SpacesuitNo it’s not a photo of space, but it is what you might have to wear if you were out there.

NASA astronaut space suits: Advanced Crew Escape Suit (ACES), Apollo A7L, Gemini G4C, Mercury IVA, MKIII, Extravehicular Mobility Unit (EMU)

Follow this link and click on Spacesuit.

http://www.nasa.gov/externalflash/nasa_spacesuit/