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I didn’t know that: Avocado, while a Spanish word, is also from Nahuatl (Aztec)


A friend read the Jalepeno blurb from yesterday and told me to go look up “avocado.”
The following is from the Online Etymology Dictionary.
I make no comment whatsoever.  😐
avocado Look up avocado at Dictionary.com
1763, from Sp. avocado, altered (by folk etymology influence of earlier Sp. avocado “lawyer,” from same L. source as advocate) from earlier aguacate, from Nahuatl ahuakatl “testicle.” So called for its shape. As a color, first attested 1947.

Interesting words that start with the letter “K”.


Interesting words that start with the letter “K”.

from The Online Etymology Dictionary

kaffeeklatsch What a word. I like the sound of this whatever it means

“gossip over cups of coffee,” 1888, from Ger., from kaffee “coffee” + klatsch “gossip” (see klatsch).

kafuffle Sounds like a problem Winnie the Pooh would have but see it as a variant of kerfuffle.

kakistocracy This is not a line of kings  who wear khakis.

1829, “government by the worst element of a society,” coined on analogy of aristocracy from Gk. kakistos “worst,” superlative of kakos “bad” (which is perhaps related to the general IE word for “defecate”) + -cracy.

karoo Interesting sounding word.  Like a coyote howl or similar sound.

“barren table land in S. Africa,” 1789, said to be from a Hottentot word meaning “dry.”

karst

name of a high, barren limestone region around Trieste; used by geologists from 1894 to refer to similar landforms. The word is the Ger. form of Slovenian kras.

katzenjammer Love this word too. Kaffeeklatsch with the katzenjammers.  Hmmmm.

1849, “a hangover,” Amer.Eng. colloquial, from Ger. katzen, comb. form of katze “cat” + jammer “distress, wailing.” Hence, “any unpleasant reaction” (1897). Katzenjammer Kids “naughty children” is from title of comic strip first drawn by Rudolph Dirks in 1897 for the “New York Journal.”

stan “country, land” (see -stan).

kazoo So was this originally something you blow or blow someone away with?

1884, Amer.Eng., probably altered from earlier bazoo “trumpet” (1877); probably ultimately onomatopoeic (cf. bazooka). In England, formerly called a Timmy Talker, in France, a mirliton.

Kazoos, the great musical wonder, … anyone can play it; imitates fowls, animals, bagpipes, etc. [1895 Montgomery Ward catalogue, p.245]

keister Just read the etymology. ‘Nuf said.

“buttocks,” 1931, perhaps transferred from underworld meaning “safe, strongbox” (1914), earlier “a burglar’s toolkit that can be locked” (1881); probably from British dialect kist (c.1300, northern form of chest, from O.N. kista) or its Ger. cognate Kiste “chest, box.” The connection may be via pickpocket slang sense of “rear trouser pocket” (1930s).

kerfuffle See kafuffle above,  Not from Winnie the Pooh then.

“row, disturbance, c.1930, first in Canadian English, ultimately from Scot. curfuffle.

kibble If the kibble was the bucket the the bits were the waste? My dog never liked kibble & bits anyway.

the noun use for ground-up meat used as dog food, etc., seems to derive from the verb meaning “to bruise or grind coarsely,” attested from 1790, first in milling, but of unknown origin. The same or an identical word was used in the coal trade in the late 19c. and in mining from the 1670s for “bucket used to haul up ore or waste.”

kicksie-wicksie Just read on  :-]

a fanciful word for “wife” in Shakespeare (“All’s Well,” II iii.297), 1601, apparently a perversion of kickshaw, late 16c. for “a fancy dish in cookery” (especially a non-native one), from pronunciation of Fr. quelque chose “something.”

kirschwasser I don’t like liquor, but this does sound good.

“liquor distilled from fermented cherry juice,” 1819, from Ger., lit. “cherry-water;” first element from M.H.G. kirse, from O.H.G. kirsa, from V.L. *ceresia, from L.L. cerasium “cherry” (see cherry).

kirtle Rhymes with girdle but not the one we commonly think of.

“a man’s tunic; a woman’s skirt,” O.E. cyrtel, related to O.N. kyrtill “tunic,” probably both from L. curtus “short” (see curt) + dim. suffix -el.

kismet I thought this had something to do with true love and all that.  Evidently not.

1834, from Turk. qismet, from Arabic qismah, qismat “portion, lot, fate,” from root of qasama “he divided.”

kith Kith and kin. You’ve hear of this one.

O.E. cyðð “native country, home,” from cuð “known,” pp. of cunnan “to know” (see can (v.)). The alliterative phrase kith and kin (late 14c.) originally meant “country and kinsmen.”

kitsch Not short for kitchen. At least not a clean one.

1926, from Ger., lit. “gaudy, trash,” from dial. kitschen “to smear.”

kiwi A bird or a berry.

“type of flightless bird,” 1835, from Maori kiwi, of imitative origin. As slang for “a New Zealander,” it is attested from 1918. The kiwi fruit (Actinia chinesis), was originally imported to the U.S. from China (c.1966) and is known in New Zealand as Chinese gooseberry (1925).

klaxon Sounds like something from a Sci/fi movie. The Klaxtons arrived from the planet Xenon.

“loud warning horn,” 1908, originally on cars, said to have been named for the company that sold them (The Klaxon Company; distributor for Lovell-McConnell Mfg. Co., Newark, N.J.), but probably the company was named for the horn, which bore a word probably based on Gk. klazein “to roar,” cognate with L. clangere “to resound.”

kleptocracy Kleptomaniacs rule here, I guess.

“rule by a class of thieves,” 1819, originally in reference to Spain; see kleptomania + -cracy.

klezmer If this means poor musician, I guess I am one. Or used to be.

late 19c. (plural klezmorim); originally, “an itinerant East European Jewish professional musician,” from Heb. kley zemer, lit. “vessels of song,” thus “musical instruments.”

klutz Me too, unfortunately

1965 (implied in klutzy), Amer.Eng., from Yiddish klots “clumsy person, blockhead,” lit. “block, lump,” from M.H.G. klotz “lump, ball.”

klutzy

1965, from klutz + -y (2).

kn-

knish I’m hungry now.

1930, from Yiddish, from Rus. knysh, a kind of cake.

kolkhoz I thought I knew womething about the history of communes but I never heard of this.

U.S.S.R. collective farm, 1921, from Rus., contraction of kollektivnoe khozyaistvo “collective farm.”

kowtow This word deserves to be on the interesting etymology list.

1804 (n.), from Chinese k’o-t’ou custom of touching the ground with the forehead to show respect or submission, lit.

kraal Another word that belong in a sci/fi or Conan movie.

“village, pen, enclosure,” 1731, from colonial Du. kraal, from Port. curral (see corral).

Krakow I didn’t know this was named for someone named Krak.

city in southern Poland, said to have been named for a supposed founder, Krak.

krummhorn Kind of an unfortunate name for a nice instrument.

“curved wind instrument,” 1864, from Ger., lit. “crooked horn,” from krumm “curved, crooked.”

kudzu Tlk about the weed that took over the world.

1893, from Japanese kuzu. Perennial climbing plant native to Japan and China, introduced in U.S. southeast as forage (1920s) and to stop soil erosion (1930s) and quickly got out of hand.

kvass Sorry, this does not sound good to me, but tastes differ.

Russian fermented drink made from rye or barley, 1550s, from Rus. kvas “leaven,” from O.C.S. kvasu “yeast,” cognate with L. caseus “cheese.”

kvetch Me kvetch?  Never!

“to complain, whine,” 1965, from Yiddish kvetshn, lit. “squeeze, press,” from Ger. quetsche “crusher, presser.”

The history of the Nacho – the word and the snack


I went today to http://www.etymonline.com This site is a map of the wheel-ruts of modern English. Etymologies are not definitions; they’re explanations of what our words meant and how they sounded 600 or 2,000 years ago.

I selected the letter “n” and pretty much closed my eyes and pointed.  My cursor hit  nacho.
According to “The Dallas Morning News” Oct. 22, 1995], named for restaurant cook Ignacio Anaya, who invented the dish in the Mexican border town of Piedras Negras in 1943.

Then I went to Wikipedia.com  http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Nachos
Nachos originated in the city of Piedras Negras, Coahuila, Mexico, just over the border from Eagle Pass, Texas, at a restaurant called the Victory Club, owned by Rodolfo De Los Santos. One day in 1943, the wives of ten to twelve U.S. soldiers stationed at Fort Duncan in nearby Eagle Pass were in Piedras Negras on a shopping trip, and arrived at the restaurant after it had closed for the day. The maître d’, Ignacio “Nacho” Anaya, invented a new snack for them with what little he had available in the kitchen: tortillas and cheese. Anaya cut the tortillas into triangles, added longhorn cheddar cheese, quickly heated them, and added sliced jalapeño peppers. He served the dish, calling it Nacho’s especiales – meaning something like “Nacho’s special dish” in English.
Anaya went on to work at the Moderno Restaurant in Piedras Negras, which still uses the original recipe. He also opened his own restaurant, “Nacho’s Restaurant”, in Piedras Negras. Anaya’s original recipe was printed in the 1954 St. Anne’s Cookbook.
The popularity of the dish quickly spread throughout Texas. The first known appearance of the word “nachos” in English dates to 1949, from the book A Taste of Texas. Waitress Carmen Rocha is credited with introducing the dish to Los Angeles at El Cholo Mexican restaurant in 1959.
A modified version of the dish, with permanently soft cheese and pre-made tortilla chips, was marketed by a man named Frank Liberto beginning in 1977, during sporting events at Arlington Stadium in Arlington, Texas. During a Monday Night Football game, sportscaster Howard Cosell enjoyed the name “nachos”, and made a point of mentioning the dish in his broadcasts over the following weeks, further popularizing it and introducing it to a whole new audience.
Ignacio Anaya died in 1975. In his honor, a bronze plaque was erected in Piedras Negras, and October 21 was declared the International Day of the Nacho. Anaya’s son Ignacio Anaya Jr. serves as a judge at the annual nacho competition.
pecial dish” in English.
Anaya went on to work at the Moderno Restaurant in Piedras Negras, which still uses the original recipe. He also opened his own restaurant, “Nacho’s Restaurant”, in Piedras Negras. Anaya’s original recipe was printed in the 1954 St. Anne’s Cookbook.
The popularity of the dish quickly spread throughout Texas. The first known appearance of the word “nachos” in English dates to 1949, from the book A Taste of Texas. Waitress Carmen Rocha is credited with introducing the dish to Los Angeles at El Cholo Mexican restaurant in 1959.
A modified version of the dish, with permanently soft cheese and pre-made tortilla chips, was marketed by a man named Frank Liberto beginning in 1977, during sporting events at Arlington Stadium in Arlington, Texas. During a Monday Night Football game, sportscaster Howard Cosell enjoyed the name “nachos”, and made a point of mentioning the dish in his broadcasts over the following weeks, further popularizing it and introducing it to a whole new audience.
Ignacio Anaya died in 1975. In his honor, a bronze plaque was erected in Piedras Negras, and October 21 was declared the International Day of the Nacho. Anaya’s son Ignacio Anaya Jr. serves as a judge at the annual nacho competition.

AOIBHEANN Irish Pronounced: EE-van The Etomylogy and History of Names.


A new website for you.    http://www.behindthename.com/

A nice Russian name and an Irish name.  (And I thought that French was difficult to figure out how to pronounce!)

Lots of options on this site from meanings and history to such things as Popular Names, Name Translator, Random Renamer, Anagram Names, Name Themes snd Names For Twins.

Have fun.

VLADIMIR male   Russian, Serbian, Croatian, Slovene, Bulgarian, Macedonian Previous Names Means “to rule with greatness”, derived from the Slavic element volod “rule” combined with mer “great, famous”. The second element has also been associated with mir meaning “peace” or “world”. This was the name of an 11th-century Grand Duke of Kiev who is venerated as a saint because of his efforts to Christianize Russia.

AOIBHEANN
Gender: Feminine
Usage: Irish
Pronounced: EE-van  [key]
Means “beautiful sheen” in Irish Gaelic. This was the name of the mother of Saint Enda. It was also borne by Irish royalty.